…..news letter #883 – yeeesh…..

Well, back to slim pickings for new releases again. But, I’m buying used stuff like crazy lately so… COME FOR A DIG!

Oh ya… and if you follow us on Instagram, you know we’re still putting out mazing used stuff on the regular. If you don’t follow us on Instagram, WHY NOT?! And now you know.

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSTORE!!! 
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWS LETTER!!!!

….pick of the week….

stacks-of-vinyl-recordsUSED RECORDS!
I know, I know… I keep saying this but I keep buying more! A few years ago I bought a bunch of Beatles and Kinks off a guy, and this week he decided to let go of the rest of his collection, so we’ve got some really nice stuff right now. AND I just bought a couple more boxes of great Brazilian, Jazz, Psych, Experimental reissues and OGs, so those will be getting priced up and put out pretty soon too! Not to mention We keep getting little stacks of contemporary wax.

…..new arrivals…..

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Green River: Dry As A Bone (Sub Pop) LP
In tomorrow??? The story of Seattle’s rise to global rock supremacy in the late ’80s and early ’90s begins with Green River. Made up of Jeff Ament (bass), Mark Arm (guitar/vocals), Bruce Fairweather (guitar), Stone Gossard (guitar), and Alex Shumway (drums), the quintet put out three 12″s and a 7″ single during its brief existence. Green River’s influence on Seattle’s music scene spread far and wide thanks to the members’ dispersion into bands including Pearl Jam, Mudhoney, and Love Battery, as well as the punk-glam-sludge-rock songs they left behind. “By ’83, ’84, there was definitely a movement that was happening within hardcore, like Black Flag slowing down for My War,” says Arm. “The Replacements and Butthole Surfers were rearing their heads, and they’re very different bands, but they’re not hardcore – the Replacements are pretty much straight-up rock, and Butthole Surfers were God knows what. Sonic Youth’s Bad Moon Rising was around, and a lot of really interesting post-hardcore things were happening.” Green River, which formed in 1984, was part of that evolution, with a sound that straddled a lot of different genres – blues, punk, bloozy straight-ahead rock. The mini-LP Dry As A Bone, which came out in 1987, and the band’s lone full-length Rehab Doll, which came out in 1988, were released as a single CD with a few bonus cuts, including their sneering cover of David Bowie’s “Queen Bitch” and their marauding version of Dead Boys’ “Ain’t Nothin’ to Do,” in 1990 – but they’ve been unavailable on vinyl for years. Now, these slices of Seattle music history are not only back in print, they’re accompanied by items from the vaults that had been forgotten about for decades. Dry As A Bone was recorded at Jack Endino’s Reciprocal Recording in 1986, and it shows the band in furious form, with Arm’s yowl battling Fairweather and Gossard’s ferocious guitar playing on “This Town” and “Unwind” opening as a slow bluesy grind then jump-starting itself into a hyperactive chase. The deluxe edition includes Green River’s cuts from the crucial Seattle-scene compilation Deep Six, as well as long-lost songs that were recorded to the now-archaic format Betamax. Green River’s place in American music history is without question, but these recordings paint a more complete picture of the band – and of rock in the mid- to late-’80s, when punk’s faster-and-louder ideals had begun shape-shifting into other ideas. 2LP-set with gatefold jacket, custom dust sleeve and download.

File Under: Grunge
Listen Here

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Green River: Rehab Doll (Sub Pop) LP
In tomorrow??? The story of Seattle’s rise to global rock supremacy in the late ’80s and early ’90s begins with Green River. Made up of Jeff Ament (bass), Mark Arm (guitar/vocals), Bruce Fairweather (guitar), Stone Gossard (guitar), and Alex Shumway (drums), the quintet put out three 12″s and a 7″ single during its brief existence. Green River’s influence on Seattle’s music scene spread far and wide thanks to the members’ dispersion into bands including Pearl Jam, Mudhoney, and Love Battery, as well as the punk-glam-sludge-rock songs they left behind. “By ’83, ’84, there was definitely a movement that was happening within hardcore, like Black Flag slowing down for My War,” says Arm. “The Replacements and Butthole Surfers were rearing their heads, and they’re very different bands, but they’re not hardcore – the Replacements are pretty much straight-up rock, and Butthole Surfers were God knows what. Sonic Youth’s Bad Moon Rising was around, and a lot of really interesting post-hardcore things were happening.” Green River, which formed in 1984, was part of that evolution, with a sound that straddled a lot of different genres – blues, punk, bloozy straight-ahead rock. The mini-LP Dry As A Bone, which came out in 1987, and the band’s lone full-length Rehab Doll, which came out in 1988, were released as a single CD with a few bonus cuts, including their sneering cover of David Bowie’s “Queen Bitch” and their marauding version of Dead Boys’ “Ain’t Nothin’ to Do,” in 1990 – but they’ve been unavailable on vinyl for years. Now, these slices of Seattle music history are not only back in print, they’re accompanied by items from the vaults that had been forgotten about for decades. Rehab Doll, recorded largely at Seattle’s Steve Lawson Studios, bridges the gap between the taut, punky energy of Dry As a Bone and the bigger drums and thicker riffs that were coming to dominate rock in the late ’80s. This new edition of Rehab Doll includes a version of “Swallow My Pride” recorded to 8-track at Endino’s Reciprocal Recording, which features a more accurate depiction of how the band sounded when they played live. “When I listen to these mixes, I think, ‘This is how we actually sounded – this is the kind of energy we had,'” says Shumway. Green River’s place in American music history is without question, but these recordings paint a more complete picture of the band – and of rock in the mid- to late-’80s, when punk’s faster-and-louder ideals had begun shape-shifting into other ideas. 2LP-set with gatefold jacket, custom dust sleeve and download.

File Under: Grunge
Listen Here

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Earl Sweatshirt: Some Rap Songs (Columbia) LP
Earl Sweatshirt returns after a three year hiatus with his brisk third studio album, Some Rap Songs which offers up 15-songs in just 24-minutes. The follow-up to 2015’s I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside was inspired by the death of his father, former South African poet laureate Keorapetse Kgositsile, who is featured on the record. “I hope what people take away is…I guess just brevity,” Earl explained to Vulture. “I’m always trying to whittle this shit down…I have to be really thoughtful of what I’m doing. Music is a really powerful thing, and the people that I feel, like, get applauded for the subtlety are the people that care and are aware of the powerful shit that they’re wielding. I’m aware of the fact that [Some Rap Songs] is kind of a hissing thing. There’s a lot of technical imperfections. The track list has gotta be perfect, and the song gotta loop perfect, and I gotta exit before…I really dedicate a lot of myself to not over-rapping.”

File Under: Hip Hop
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Anderson.Paak: Oxnard (12 Tone) LP
With a soulful essence harkening back to the iconic voices of the ’70s, yet embodying a raw uniqueness fully present in the now, acclaimed singer/rapper/drummer/producer, Anderson .Paak, has successfully alchemized a cross-section of musical styles – R&B, hip-hop, and dance – into a solid, undeniable, irresistible “genreless sound.” Anderson’s new album, Oxnard, is a nod to the Southern California city where he grew up. It’s the Grammy-nominated artist’s third studio album and first to be released on Dr. Dre’s label Aftermath Entertainment. He shared with Rolling Stone that “… this is the album [he] dreamed of making in high school, when [he] was listening to [Jay-Z]’s The Blueprint, The Game’s The Documentary, and [Kanye West’s] The College Dropout.” Oxnard includes his latest single, “Tints” with Kendrick Lamar along with album features from J. Cole and Pusha T plus notable production from Dr. Dre and Om’Mas Keith.

File Under: Hip Hop
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